June 13, 2019

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Kansas City Area Education News

Your Guide To The Kansas City Council Election In The Candidates’ Own Words

By Christina Elias, KCUR
Voters in Kansas City, Missouri, will decide their new mayor and city council members in municipal elections June 18.  Eight of the 13 seats on the council are contested. Three current council members are facing challenges, while six races involve entirely new candidates. (Four candidates are running unopposed: newcomer Kevin O’Neill in the 1st District At-Large; and current council members Heather Hall in the 1st District, Teresa Loar in the 2nd District At-Large and Kevin McManus in the 6th District). The 13th council seat will be filled by the newly elected mayor.

Northland principal on paid leave after tweeting gun photo to school shooting survivor

By Zac Summers, Fox4KC.com>
A principal at an elementary school in Platte City is on paid administrative leave pending the outcome of an investigation into a tweet he recently posted.  On Tuesday, Dr. Chad Searcey, principal at Compass Elementary School, posted a tweet in response to a video encouraging Congress to fund research on gun violence. The video was from David Hogg, a Parkland, Florida school shooting survivor turned gun control activist.  “Gun violence is the second leading cause of death for the young people in the United States, yet basically gets no research funding from the federal government at all whatsoever,” Hogg said in the video. “We have a chance to fund it currently in this Congress with this Senate and give $50 million to the CDC and NIH.”

Why Education Isn’t A Bigger Issue In The Kansas City Mayor’s Race

By ELLE MOXLEY, KCUR

Kansas City Mayor Sly James made education a top priority when he took office eight years ago.  He succeeded in getting the business and philanthropic community to rally around third grade reading, but he couldn’t convince voters to pass a pre-K sales tax.  Now Kansas City is about to pick a new mayor.  “Every single person is asking about education in their top three issues,” said Councilwoman Jolie Justus, who is running against Councilman Quinton Lucas.  Yet at town halls and forums, Justus and Lucas have spent most of their time talking about housing, development and crime.  That’s because there’s only so much the mayor of Kansas City can do to influence education policy.

Missouri Education News

Northland principal on paid leave after tweeting gun photo to school shooting survivor

By Zac Summers, Fox4KC.com
A principal at an elementary school in Platte City is on paid administrative leave pending the outcome of an investigation into a tweet he recently posted.  On Tuesday, Dr. Chad Searcey, principal at Compass Elementary School, posted a tweet in response to a video encouraging Congress to fund research on gun violence. The video was from David Hogg, a Parkland, Florida school shooting survivor turned gun control activist.  “Gun violence is the second leading cause of death for the young people in the United States, yet basically gets no research funding from the federal government at all whatsoever,” Hogg said in the video. “We have a chance to fund it currently in this Congress with this Senate and give $50 million to the CDC and NIH.”

National Education News

Digital Surveillance and School Safety: 5 Things Administrators Need to Know

By Benjamin Herold, Education Week

Under intense pressure to prevent the next school shooting, K-12 leaders are deploying massive digital surveillance systems that vacuum up digital data and scan for possible warning signs.  But as Education Week recently reported, there are serious questions about whether such systems are effective. They also raise huge concerns about privacy and civil liberties, often thrusting school administrators into a vast ethical gray area. And when new digital surveillance technologies are implemented, they create a tremendous amount of new work—as well as potentially new liabilities—for schools already stretched thin by other demands.

Homeless Students’ Struggles Come Into Sharper Focus Under ESSA

By Corey Mitchell, Education Week

The U.S. high school graduation rate has risen to an all-time high, but schools are still struggling to help their most vulnerable students earn diplomas. The “Building a Grad Nation” report, released Tuesday by Civic, Johns Hopkins University, America’s Promise Alliance, and the Alliance for Excellent Education, found that students with disabilities, English-language learners, and homeless children—all at less than 70 percent—are the student subgroups with the lowest graduation rates in the country. The No Child Left Behind Act required states to disaggregate student-achievement data and graduation rates for subgroups, which led schools to focus on improving education for students with disabilities and English-language learners.

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